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What kind of kitchen refurbishment do you need? Options, different scales of refurbishment ranging from small changes to a full revamp

How to get a new kitchen for less money

Considering a kitchen refurbishment? If you’ve done any research at all, you’ll quickly learn that a full kitchen remodel can cost more than you’d like to spend. Fortunately, many British kitchens can be updated without being fully replaced, for example by replacing cabinet doors and installing new worktops. Moreover, by dealing directly with suppliers like Surrey Marble and Granite you can cut down your costs on individual items and only buy what you need. Read on to learn more about different options for kitchen refurbishment that can save you money.

 

Updating paint and tiles

A coat of paint is often the quickest, cheapest way to freshen up a space. Painting the ceiling can be particularly effective as it’s often hard to notice the gradual greying of paint when you can’t get close to it. Some tile patterns and colours have dated rapidly, so you may find that either replacing or painting over the tiles in your kitchen can update it without touching the cabinets or appliances.

 

Replacing cabinet doors and worktops

If you’re happy with the layout of your kitchen, then retaining the cabinet bodies and simply replacing the doors and worktop is a great option for an affordable kitchen refurbishment. By working directly with suppliers like Surrey Marble and Granite you can get pieces cut to fit the exact dimensions of your existing cabinet frames. This is particularly important if your space isn’t a standard size as retailers may only offer a limited choice of fixed sizes. At Surrey Marble and Granite we cut each stone worktop to exactly fit the space it’s intended for so you know you’re getting the best results. We also cut exact spaces for sinks and hobs, so if you’re considering replacing either it’s best to do it at the same time as updating your worktop.

 

Partial layout change

Creating a whole new layout in your kitchen is typically the most expensive option as it means removing all the cabinets and appliances. However, it can be worthwhile as it may transform the space, for example giving you a place to eat in the kitchen or perhaps letting you replace small, old appliances with full-size modern ones. When changing the layout, consider whether there’s any element of the kitchen that can be salvaged. For example, if you’ll still have cabinets along a particular wall, can the cabinet bodies be retained, even if they need new doors? Would just making a few smaller changes give the same effect?

 

Structural problems and rot

Sadly, some levels of damage can’t be plastered over. If you’re dealing with structural damage, sagging floors, water damage, dry rot or other major problems, you may have to replace the entire kitchen simply to ensure that your home is safe and healthy. If you suspect that your kitchen is suffering from this level of problem, be sure to consult an expert before planning your kitchen refurbishment.

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