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How to polish Marble

Marble is a beautiful material for a worktop. It brings life and style to any kitchen or bathroom and will never go out of style. No matter the look of your home there’s a colour of marble that will fit perfectly, be it white, black or even pink. Marble is bright and smooth and will open any room. It is recognised as the highest quality surface for a worktop and are as popular now as ever. These stones require a certain level of maintenance to keep them sparkling.

Polishing Marble Worktops

Polishing the marble can be slightly repetitive but is worth it for that fresh gleam. Give your marble surface a wipe over with a dry soft cloth to get rid of any dust lying on the surface and then wet another soft cloth and wipe over it again. Now go over it again with a stone cleaner of your choice and wipe it off. Give it a good buff to get it shining by rubbing in small circles. If you want to make your own cleaner you can, just ensure you don’t use acidic cleaners such as bleach and vinegar and don’t use any abrasive, scratchy cloths and cleaning pads. Add some mild washing up liquid to a damp soft sponge and wipe down the counter top before rinsing well with water.

What if there’s stains?

If you spill anything on your marble surface it should be quickly wiped off to avoid staining. Anything acidic, such as lemon juice, or oily substances are the highest risk so be aware and make sure you get it clean as soon as possible. If you’ve accidentally stained your marble, then you can use a poultice at least 24 hours before you begin the polishing process. This will penetrate the surface and eradicate any stains that have been trapped underneath. We would recommend you test a very small spot to test before you target any larger areas just in case.

Sealing marble surfaces

Most marble surfaces will need to be sealed every 3-6 months for protection, as it’s a porous surface and will end up becoming more susceptible to staining. You can do this yourself at home or hire a professional if needed. To begin, follow the polishing instructions above and make sure the surface is clean and dry. Apply the sealant evenly across the surface with a clean rag and leave to allow to be absorbed. We recommend keeping little ones out of the kitchen at the stage, so the process isn’t interrupted. After a few hours go over it with another coat and leave to settle overnight. The next morning use a clean cloth so buff away an excess that’s been left over and you are now free to enjoy your sealed worktop. Carrying out this process will help your marble to last longer and look better in the long run.

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