Fill out the form below to request a quote
Name*
Email*
Contact Number*
Address Line 1*
Address Line 2
Town*
Postcode*
Extra Info

Recent Posts

9 ways to use limestone in your home

01.02.2018
no comments

5 reasons we’re mad for quartz

30.01.2018
no comments

How to choose stone flooring

25.01.2018
no comments

What are synthetic granite worktops?

15.01.2018
no comments

How to plan an open kitchen/dining area

open-plan-kitchen

One way to create more space and let more light into your home is to knock down some walls. Turning small, separate kitchen and dining areas into a single larger space can transform your home, giving you a much more pleasant and usable area – as long as you make it over the building and design hurdles that stand in your way.

Can you actually take those walls down?

Before you get too attached to your dream of a sunny kitchen / dining room, with its limestone worktops and French farmhouse décor, find out which walls are providing essential support for what’s overhead. Removing a supporting wall, even if you can replace it with a steel beam, can be prohibitively expensive so don’t make any assumptions.

Get creative and make the kitchen bigger

If you’ve got a long hall, a conservatory or even just some built in cupboards you hardly use, consider adding that space into your new open plan kitchen. For many homes, adding a conservatory or extension on the kitchen to create a larger open space is a good choice and may be a better investment than demolishing critical internal walls.

What will you lose when the walls go?

It can be hard to picture what a space will look like without walls in the way so it’s a good idea to use free online tools to create a 3D model of your new kitchen. Remember that when you remove walls you’ll lose cabinet space, and may need to redo electrics and plumbing, if major appliances need to be moved. If your kitchen has been a typical U-shape, with counters on three sides, will you still have enough space if you replace one with a butcher’s block or limestone worktop island?

How do you use your rooms?

Ideally, you want your new open plan space to be even more useful than your existing, separate, rooms. Creating an open area can be a great way of encouraging families to spend more time together but it also makes it harder for someone to get away for a bit of peace and quiet. If you’re fed up of yelling at the kids through the wall while you cook, open plan will be great. Think about all the ways your family use the existing spaces, from pet grooming to homework, quick breakfasts to formal dinner parties, and imagine those events happening in the new space.

Is it what you really want?

Open plan isn’t the best choice for every space and every family. As an example, if you work from the dining room table you may not want to be distracted by your partner making dinner or the dirty dishes in the sink. Open plan dining also tends to be less formal. However beautiful your limestone worktops are, you won’t have a door to shut to hide the effort and mess of your cooking as you bring a lovely dish to the table.

 

Recommended Articles

Creating a space that’s as effective when you’re rushing to get ready for work as when you’re relaxing at the end of the day isn’t easy, but it’s well worth the effort. The master bathroom is a heavily used but often ignored part of the home. With a little effort, you can transform a functional closet-like space into a luxurious retreat. Here are our tips to get you started.

21.07.2015
no comments
Read More

This week, my interest has been peaked by cube housing in Rotterdam, Netherlands. The houses, designed by Piet Blom, are designed to ‘furnish’ a pedestrian bridge covering a busy street in the centre of the city. The houses are based on the idea of a tree, where by a ‘canopy’ is created underneath which can be used for children to play in for example. You can see this effect in one of the images below, the houses leave only a very small area of light between them at the top […]

12.06.2012
no comments
Read More

Marble stairs have a timeless elegance, and are the centrepiece of many homes. Of course, with the range of choices available today, the white marble staircase that so many princesses have swept down in film and fact isn’t the only option. You could have a granite tile staircase, or a bright Silestone stair with the same durable and practical features that make marble such a hit. But if your stairs aren’t stone to start with, how can you convert them?

22.03.2016
no comments
Read More