Fill out the form below to request a quote
Name*
Email*
Contact Number*
Address Line 1*
Address Line 2
Town*
Postcode*
Extra Info

I agree to receiving offers and services by email from Surrey Marble & Granite

I agree to Surrey Marble & Granite Terms & Conditions

Recent Posts

What is sintered stone?

16.07.2018
no comments

How to create a feature wall using stone

How to create a feature wall using stone

Creating a statement wall is a great way to draw the eye and give your room a focus without taking up any floor space. While it would be lovely to have rooms large enough to fit, never mind lose, a grand piano in, for most British families space is a major limitation. A feature wall made of rough limestone cladding or glossy granite tiles can be transformative, giving the whole space an atmosphere without changing another thing.

Having worked with builders and interior designers across Surrey and beyond, we have plenty of experience in creating stone feature walls. Here are a few key questions to ask yourself as you go along.

Where is the focus of this room?

A feature wall will draw the eye, but should also be more-or-less where the eye falls naturally. As a general rule, this will be the opposite corner or side from the main doorway, or where your eyes comfortably linger when you walk into the room. However much you might like to shift the focus, it’s not always possible – you’ll have little hope, for example of drawing attention to a feature wall that’s behind the door as you walk in.

Is it light or very dark?

The type of stone you use and the finish will either add light or strip it out of a room. As an example, a light limestone with a rustic finish will tend to reflect warm tones into the rest of the room, while polished black granite tiles will absorb light and reflect back only icy notes. The two stones represent very different aesthetic styles, but they also work best in different settings – one would do better in a sunny room, the other in artificial light.

When do you want to change the other décor?

For some people, getting a house done up is the end of a hard slog, and they’re glad not to do it again for a decade. For others, furnishings are constantly shifting. Whichever camp you fall into, let your nature influence your feature wall. If you prefer to change your colour scheme and furnishings regularly, then choose a classic natural stone, such as slate-grey granite tiles, that will look great as your sofa shifts through the rainbow from magenta to teal to cream. If you just want to finish the project, on the other hand, a striking or brightly coloured stone, such as Silestone, is a great choice.

What are your walls made of?

Even thin granite tiles weigh a lot more than a coat of paint, so it’s important to check that your walls can handle stone cladding before you put it up. In most cases, if your walls are brick or concrete they’ll be fine without further support. However, interior walls may be partitions made of wooden struts and plaster board. While these do a great job of dividing rooms without taking up much space, they will usually need to be reinforced before they’ll be ready for stone.

Recommended Articles

colours_quartz_granite

Marble, granite or quartz – how to choose?! Choosing a new kitchen worktop is tough as you want to make sure you’ve picked something durable, practical, gorgeous, timelessly stylish, good value for money and that you’ll love for years. Even if you’ve narrowed the choice down to a stone worktop, such as marble, granite, limestone or quartz, then there are still dozens of options available. Below, we explain some of the differences between different types of worktop but if you have any more questions, just give us a call – […]

06.06.2018
no comments
Read More

Some of the world’s most famous office buildings use stone to create a striking interior, including the Empire State building (once the world’s tallest building) and the Burj Kalifa (currently the world’s tallest building). Stepping into the marble-clad lobby of the Empire State Building is as impressive today as it was when the tower was built in 1931. Why? Because marble lasts, so the designer’s original intentions are as fresh and vibrant as they were when the stone was first installed.

11.08.2014
no comments
Read More

This week I have been mostly looking at Roman Aqueducts. The first, the Aqua Appia was built in 312 BC to provide the populace of Rome up to 75,537 cubic meters of water per day. The amazing thing about this structure is that the majority of it’s length was subterranean and dropped only 10m throughout it’s entirety. Aqueducts move water through gravity alone and the Aqua Appia, built from stone, brick and the special volcanic element pozzuolona also afforded itself protection by it’s underground construction. During the Samnite wars, the […]

16.07.2012
no comments
Read More