Surrey Marble and Granite is currently open with a limited workforce to enable safe social distancing in line with government directions to safe guard our staff and customers.

SMG is open for visits by APPOINTMENT ONLY to ensure social distancing is maintained in our showroom and safeguard our staff and customers. Please contact the office on 01428 651940 to check availability and book.

Info
Fill out the form below to request a quote

    Name*
    Email*
    Contact Number*
    Address Line 1*
    Address Line 2
    Town*
    Postcode*
    Additional Project Details

    I agree to receiving offers and services by email from Surrey Marble & Granite

    I agree to Surrey Marble & Granite Terms & Conditions

    Recent Posts

    Marble Effect Home Decor

    16.06.2021
    no comments

    How to Clean Marble Bathroom Tiles

    22.03.2021
    no comments

    Potted History of Kitchen Worktops

    A typical kitchen in today’s household has – since at least the early twentieth century – comprised a continuous kitchen worktop surface punctuated with elements such as sinks and perhaps spaces for appliances. Beneath the kitchen worktop you will usually find base structures that comprise cabinets, shelves and drawers. You may also have other features and elements, such as an “island” in the middle of the kitchen, similarly comprising a kitchen worktop with cabinetry beneath it, or a breakfast bar – also comprised of a similar surface to the standard kitchen worktop.

    The main purposes of the kitchen worktop are function, resilience, aesthetics and – upon original installation of a fitted kitchen – the costs involved. Typically, a kitchen worktop will be just over two feet in width. The length of the worktop as it runs around a kitchen will be determined by the size of the kitchen itself. They are usually complemented with shelving units or shelves above them at some points, and they usually have a small overspill or overhang area or so that they protrude slightly from the units that are beneath them.

    This means that any spillages from the kitchen worktop are more likely to fall straight to the floor, rather than dripping down the drawer or cabinet fronts. The surface of the kitchen worktop ought to be as functional and as non porous as possible, but in terms of decorative effects, they can be as elaborate or as simple as people’s tastes dictate. The overall effect ought to match other elements of the kitchen. While a kitchen worktop will accommodate sinks, cookers and ovens and other appliances, it also may be made to match them in terms of style.

    Today’s kitchen worktops are made from a wide range of materials. The use of wood as a surface is not regarded as hygienic according to laws and regulations of both the United States and the European Union – which is why you’re unlikely to find them in restaurant kitchens in either territories. However, tests have shown that wood is in fact more hygienic than other surfaces in many respects. For example, bacteria from uncooked meat may soak into wood, but it is likely to die there rather than multiply. Metals such as stainless steel, zinc, copper and aluminium can be used as kitchen worktop surfaces and in sinks or basins too.

    Crafted or reinforced glass can be used in kitchen work surfaces. Concrete is also an unlikely but not uncommon worktop surface. Surfaces that use compressed fibres or laminates are also extremely common.

    Finally, marble and granite worktops have come into their own as kitchen surfaces. The height of style today, they also have counterparts in manmade or engineered stone, which is likely to comprise 93 per cent natural stone (such as quartz) and within that aggregate, resins, binders and colours.

    In much the same way as a granite worktop may start as a large slab that is cut to size, manmade stone kitchen worktops will be pre made in larger slabs before being cut in the same manner – using either a diamond blade, or a jet cutter.

    Recommended Articles

      Britain is full of beautiful period homes, from humble cottages and converted barns to the grand houses that once dominated the entire village. Most older buildings include period stone work, such as a stone floor, fireplace, staircase or wall panelling. This stone is often critical to maintaining the character of the house, so what should you do if the stone has been damaged, perhaps by a previous owner? The good news is that what’s best for the house is often what’s best for your pocket: restore, repair, replace, retire […]

    15.09.2014
    no comments
    Read More

    Stone floors can last decades – and some, like those in historic Surrey churches, have stood up under centuries of use. To keep a stone floor looking its best, it’s important to take care of it. Stone floors are typically scratch and stain resistant, but that doesn’t mean they’re impervious to damage. Fortunately, in most cases, the damage can be repaired and Surrey Marble and Granite are proud to offer a repair and refinishing service for many stone floors. Replacing a stone floor can be costly, and can significantly alter […]

    30.05.2013
    no comments
    Read More

    Updating your home   When looking to update your home, your first instinct might be to don the overalls and arm yourself with paint, brushes and rollers.  Some might even start ripping out kitchen units or a bathroom suite with reckless abandon, determined to regenerate a home that may be looking tired or dated.  There are other improvement options that are less common and will both refresh and add an individual feel to your home.   Flooring   One area of renovation and home improvement that is often overlooked is […]

    25.02.2013
    no comments
    Read More