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How to choose the right colour for your kitchen worktop

A stone kitchen worktop may be the most durable piece in your kitchen, lasting long after you’ve changed curtains or blinds, repainted walls and even replaced cabinet doors. As a result, choosing the right colour can feel like a lot of pressure. As expert stoneworkers, we’ve fitted kitchen worktops for family homes of every type and style. This includes granite and quartz worktops. Below you’ll find a few of the tips we’ve picked up along the way.

Go with one you love

There’s one thing that Marie Kondo, decluttering expert, got right – having things in your home that “spark joy” will make you happy. If at all possible, we recommend visiting our showroom in person and spending some time with the stones. For many people, a particular stone, colourway or texture will make them smile every time they touch it in the warehouse. That effect might not last more than a decade, but it’s definitely worth grabbing when you find it.

Light worktops make spaces brighter

Many British kitchens are small and dark, with little natural light. Light or white stone worktops, particularly with a mirror polish finish, will literally bounce light around, making the space feel brighter and larger. If pure white feels too sterile, consider pale shades in any colour, from delicate pinks through creamy yellows.

Neutrals are great if you love change

Counter-intuitively, a neutral (grey, beige, black or white quartz worktops…) countertop may be the best choice for people who love change. As you’re unlikely to want to change your stone kitchen worktop regularly, choose a shade that makes a good backdrop or foil for items you can change more frequently, such as curtains, painted walls, ornaments, crockery and decorations. Some of our customers even use open shelves and picture ledges to let them change their ‘look’ as seasons and holidays come round.

Use different shades to mark out different areas

If your kitchen is multi-purpose, you can use different shades of the same stone – or different stones altogether – to create clear areas for different uses. As an example, many people like to give their worktops a different look to built-in eating areas such as a breakfast bar. We’ve even seen stunning kitchen islands pairing two different stones in a single area, giving the dining and prep areas a distinct vibe. Equally, open plan kitchen/dining rooms often use an island with a statement top to create a visual barrier between the two areas.

Your worktop will be a statement piece

With a typical built-in kitchen, the cabinets and worktop are a much more dominant feature of the design than the floor or wall colours. This is particularly true in small kitchens and is the opposite to how we think of most rooms. As a result, whatever worktop you choose will be one of the first things people notice in your kitchen and also likely to make a lasting impression. Invest in something that is beautiful, tactile, and also practical and you’ll have an inviting yet elegant kitchen whether your style is country farmhouse or urban minimalist.

Interested in our products? Feel free to contact us today!

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